PANDA FREE ANTIVIRUS

Overview
Key features:

-Can create bootable rescue disk
-Silent detection mode
-Windows XP SP2/Vista/7/8/8.1/10
-Requires Intel Pentium 300MHz or faster, 265MB RAM, 240MB free disk space
Panda Free Antivirus 2016 promises a lightweight, partially cloud-based anti-malware solution. It’s the minimalist entry in Panda’s range, which includes three other paid-for anti-virus and protection suites offering a range of extra programs and features bundled alongside.

Panda put in a strong performance in AV-TEST’s spring results, with 99.9% detection rate in a scan of widespread recent malware samples. It performed well in real-world live exposure tests, too, with a 100% protection score in March and 98.8% in April – and it misidentified only a handful of legitimate programs as malicious.

However, its performance was poor on everything except file copying. AV-TEST found that Panda slowed program launch speeds, downloads, website loading and, in particular, installation far more than average across all anti-virus software.

Like some of its rivals, Panda Free by default wants to install some extra software and services from its sponsors. You’ll probably want to untick the option of setting Yahoo as your default search provider and Yahoo MyStart as your default browser homepage.

However, the case for the Panda Security Toolbar module is less clear-cut. It’s a browser plugin that can warn you of potentially malicious links, but it’s also adware that follows your browsing habits and suggests related promotions, which is likely to be a security concern for some and an irritant to others. It certainly doesn’t feel particularly comfortable in a piece of security software.

Panda’s Notification Area icon gives you a right-click menu where you can enable its silent Gaming and Multimedia mode, and pause the program’s monitoring capabilities. However, most of Panda’s features are to be found in its main client interface, a cheery-looking turquoise-and-white affair that follows the Windows Modern UI style.
The client’s Start page let you see how many files Panda has scanned and immediately gives your PC a full, critical area or custom scan. Panda Free anti-virus comes equipped with a Process Monitor, USB Protection tool and a Rescue Kit creator, and if you’ve signed up for a Panda account, you can view the status of other Windows, Mac OS X, Android and iOS devices associated with the same account.
Panda’s USB drive protector offers to scan any USB drive you insert by default. You can also use its Vaccinate tool to disable auto-run files on USB drives, or configure it to vaccinate any USB drive you insert. While auto-run files can be a threat, support for the feature is limited under Windows 10, so this is less useful these days. However, completely crippling a USB drive’s auto-run files could potentially affect the functionality of a tiny minority of legacy software tools that rely on such a file to work on older computers, so it’s worth keeping in mind.
The Process Monitor flags up potentially malicious processes, displays the number of HTTP connections they’re using and provides a blocking feature. However, it isn’t as easy to get a complete overview of your processes as you would via either Task Manager of Microsoft TechNet favourite Process Explorer.
Finally, the Rescue Kit screen lets you create a bootable USB disk that connects to Panda’s Cloud Scanner or immediately run it on your PC. Panda Cloud Scanner is a separate emergency-use program that Panda says “detects what traditional virus scanning can’t detect”. It’s certainly very sensitive, picking up a couple of harmless but unnecessary registry keys and cached internet files as potentially unwanted, although not malicious, content on our very clean test PC.
Panda has a few extra settings, which you can use to instruct it to scan compressed files by default, ask before neutralising a virus, add exceptions, disable some scanning features and change the default weekly deletion schedule for quarantined files.
While Panda did provide capable protection in AV-TEST’s research, it also has a rather heavy impact on system performance – and we’re not fans of its ad-laden browser plugin, so while it’s a decent performer, other products in this test are more attractive.

FS-UAE Amiga Emulation

FS-UAE includes an easy-to-use graphical configuration program which allows you to enjoy FS-UAE and Amiga emulation without writing configuration files.
UAE is a computer emulator which emulates the hardware of the Commodore Amiga range of computers. Released under the GNU General Public License.
UAE has been ported to many host operating systems, including Linux, macOS, FreeBSD, DOS, Microsoft Windows, RISC OS, BeOS, Palm OS, Android, the Xbox console, the PSP, PSVita and GP2X handhelds, iOS, the Wii and Dreamcast consoles, and even to AmigaOS, MorphOS and AROS.

PPSSPP A PSP emulator

PPSSPP can run your PSP games on your PC in full HD resolution, and play them on Android too. It can even upscale textures that would otherwise be too blurry as they were made for the small screen of the original PSP.

Even on modern Android phones and tablets, you can often run at double the original resolution.
PPSSPP is an open source project, licensed under the GPL 2.0 (or later). Anyone is welcome to contribute improvements to the code. Partly thanks to such contributions, PPSSPP’s compatibility is steadily increasing, letting us all play our PSP games on the devices of our choice.

MrBoom

Mr.Boom is a Bomberman clone for the RetroArch platform and was converted from DOS assembly using asm2c.

It runs on all RetroArch platforms: Android, Linux, Mac Os X, Nintendo Gamecube (NGC), Nintendo Wii, Raspberry Pi, Sony Playstation 3 (PS3), Sony Playstation Portable (PSP), Windows, Xbox, Xbox360…

It can also be compiled as a stand-alone version using SDL2.

Atari800 Emulator

Atari800 is the emulator of Atari 8-bit computer systems and 5200 game console for Unix, Linux, Amiga, MS-DOS, Atari TT/Falcon, MS-Windows, MS WinCE, Sega Dreamcast, Android and other systems supported by the SDL library. Our main objective is to create a freely distributable portable emulator (i.e. with source code available). It can be configured to run in the following ways :

  • “simple” version (many platforms) – uses only the standard C library
  • curses (many platforms)
  • X Window + Optional XVIEW or MOTIF User Interface
  • CBM Amiga
  • MS-DOS (DJGPP)
  • Atari Falcon/TT and compatible machines
  • MS Windows (DirectX)
  • SDL (running on _many_ platforms)
  • WinCE
  • Sega Dreamcast
  • JVM (Java applet)
  • Android

Atari800 emulator was written by David Firth in 1995 and released under the GPL. So it was available with full source code in C. The code was written with portability in mind and that allowed various people to create ports of Atari800 for PC, Amiga, Atari, Mac and machines running UNIX-like operating systems.

As there were no new versions of Atari800 since spring of 1997 several people (Perry McFarlane, Rich Lawrence, Thomas Richter, Radek Sterba, Robert Golias and me) started updating the last available v0.8.0 source code independently. Later we all got in touch and started working together. I also contacted the original Atari800 author, David Firth, who basically agreed with me maintaining the source code and putting out source and binary releases.
Since then many new talented programmers joined the Atari800 development team and helped improving the emulator.

Atari800 is a portable emulator that runs on many different platforms ranging from handhelds to desktop computers to graphics workstations. Since some of these machines can run several different operating systems here is the (incomplete) list of operating systems where Atari800 runs:

  • All 11 Debian GNU/Linux platforms
  • MS DOS
  • MS Windows
  • MS WinCE
  • MacOS X/PPC
  • TOS
  • BeOS
  • OS/2
    Amiga