Sega Dreamcast

The Sega Dreamcast (ドリームキャスト) is a home video game console manufactured by Sega as a successor to the Sega Saturn. It was originally released in November 1998, becoming the first machine to be released in what is now known as the sixth generation of video game consoles, sharing a platform with the PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube and the Xbox.
The Dreamcast is a small, white box with aesthetics designed to appeal to a wide-ranging audience. It was envisioned as an “128-bit” “super console”, designed to leapfrog “32-bit” and “64-bit” contemporaries in the form of the PlayStation and Nintendo 64, respectively (although from a technical standpoint, its main processor deals in 32-bit or 64-bit instructions, with the 128-bit figure coming from the graphics hardware). Incidentally the Dreamcast was the last home console to use “bits” as a selling point, with processing capabilities now typically measured in other ways.

Demul

Demul is a Sega Dreamcast emulator able to play commercial games. Please check the official website for a compatibility list.
DEmul, a Dreamcast emulator which also emulates the arcade boards of Naomi 1, Naomi 2, Hikaru, and Atomiswave.

nullDC

nullDC is an open source Sega Dreamcast and NAOMI emulator for Windows, developed by drk||Raziel (currently under the nickname skmp) and ZeZu. It was released under the MIT license.

nullDC requires DirectX 9.0c, Visual C++ runtime libraries and optionally WinPcap for modem emulation. BIOS files are also needed. It has a plugin architecture, with several alternative implementations (some ported from Chankast) for graphics, sound, reading games burned to CD-ROMs (it cannot read GD-ROMs directly) or disk image files, memory cards, etc.

Atomiswave

Atomiswave Sammy Corporation

The Sammy Atomiswave is an arcade board created by Sammy, built around the Sega Dreamcast and NAOMI hardware architecture. The hardware is fairly similar to a retail Dreamcast, but has twice the VRAM and four times the audio RAM. Despite this upgrade, it still has less power and memory than the NAOMI. Games can connect to the Internet using either the standard 56k system or through “AW-Net” (these need to be investigated — TODO).
The Atomiswave is a custom arcade system board and cabinet from Sammy Corporation. It is based on Sega’s NAOMI system board (thus it’s common to see the “Sega” logo on its boot up screen). The Atomiswave uses interchangeable game cartridges and the cabinet’s control panel can be easily switched out with different control sets, including dual joysticks, dual lightguns and a steering wheel.
With the retirement of the aging Neo Geo MVS system, SNK Playmore chose the Atomiswave as its next system to develop games for. In a contract with Sammy, SNK Playmore agreed to develop five games for the Atomiswave system. Metal Slug 6 was SNK Playmore’s fifth game for the Atomiswave, after which SNK moved on to a Taito Type X2 arcade board.

Atari800 Emulator

Atari800 is the emulator of Atari 8-bit computer systems and 5200 game console for Unix, Linux, Amiga, MS-DOS, Atari TT/Falcon, MS-Windows, MS WinCE, Sega Dreamcast, Android and other systems supported by the SDL library. Our main objective is to create a freely distributable portable emulator (i.e. with source code available). It can be configured to run in the following ways :

  • “simple” version (many platforms) – uses only the standard C library
  • curses (many platforms)
  • X Window + Optional XVIEW or MOTIF User Interface
  • CBM Amiga
  • MS-DOS (DJGPP)
  • Atari Falcon/TT and compatible machines
  • MS Windows (DirectX)
  • SDL (running on _many_ platforms)
  • WinCE
  • Sega Dreamcast
  • JVM (Java applet)
  • Android

Atari800 emulator was written by David Firth in 1995 and released under the GPL. So it was available with full source code in C. The code was written with portability in mind and that allowed various people to create ports of Atari800 for PC, Amiga, Atari, Mac and machines running UNIX-like operating systems.

As there were no new versions of Atari800 since spring of 1997 several people (Perry McFarlane, Rich Lawrence, Thomas Richter, Radek Sterba, Robert Golias and me) started updating the last available v0.8.0 source code independently. Later we all got in touch and started working together. I also contacted the original Atari800 author, David Firth, who basically agreed with me maintaining the source code and putting out source and binary releases.
Since then many new talented programmers joined the Atari800 development team and helped improving the emulator.

Atari800 is a portable emulator that runs on many different platforms ranging from handhelds to desktop computers to graphics workstations. Since some of these machines can run several different operating systems here is the (incomplete) list of operating systems where Atari800 runs:

  • All 11 Debian GNU/Linux platforms
  • MS DOS
  • MS Windows
  • MS WinCE
  • MacOS X/PPC
  • TOS
  • BeOS
  • OS/2
    Amiga